How to Find Constellations | Indiana DNR

How to Find Constellations | Indiana DNR


Let’s start with the Big Dipper, where is
the Big dipper? Up there, there we go, right there. We are going to start, we have the four points
of the pot, we then have the handle, and there’s our Big Dipper. Take the last two stars, we’re going to
go five times that distance to find the north star. There’s the North Star, is it the brightest
one? No, not very bright. North Star, Polaris, makes up the Little Dipper. The Little Dipper, the handle is crooked,
so it comes up and there’s the pot. It always looks like one dipper is pouring
into the other one. All of the stars will appear to circle Polaris. So through the course of the night, these
stars are going to go this way, around Polaris. Go back to the Big Dipper, notice that the
Big Dipper becomes a great sign, if you can find that, you can find a lot of other constellations. I’m going to take the handle of the Big
Dipper and I’m going to follow a real simple saying: “Follow the Arc to Arcturus.” The Arcturus is the bright star right there. Arcturus is part of a constellation called
Boötes. Boötes is the herdsman, and Boötes, let’s
see here, he comes up like this. Next to the Little Dipper, we can jump over
to the giant “W” in the sky – Queen Cassiopeia. One more circum-polar constellation, he asked
to see Draco the Dragon. If you can find the Big Dipper and the Little
Dipper, Draco cuts right between them. What I look for is I’m going to look straight
up and look for four stars that make a kite – those are the eyeballs. Draco comes down, up, and around right through
it. All of these constellations can be seen any
night of the year.

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