How To Make A DIY Cobb And Fire Brick Rocket Stove Forge

How To Make A DIY Cobb And Fire Brick Rocket Stove Forge


Hi its Tom from GreenShortz and it’s been a while since I’ve made something out of mud and that changes today Today’s project is going to be a rocket furnace Well, at least we’ll see if we can get it to rock it a while ago I made a plaster and perlite furnace that I didn’t make a video about because it was just something for me to experiment with and when I had bought the crucible for it, I Underestimated how big this one was going to be? This is a number tin crucible and it’s much too big for that little furnace that I made so I want to make a Big furnace today and I want to do it out of cob and its purpose is gonna be to melt aluminium now I tried to melt aluminium cans with the small furnace that I’ve made and it did okay I just couldn’t get enough capacity in there while it was hot to Make it worth the effort. So I want to make a bigger furnace so I can melt more cans at one time I got my ratty green shorts shirt on today because this is gonna be a messy job the cob I’m gonna make is using Georgia clay, which is the native soil around here. That’s below the topsoil Sand which I’m gonna scavenge from the local Creek and just some straw and in place of that. I’m going to use Weeds that I pull out of my yard that have a stronger stem So what I find is that when I make a video if I have everything around me that I need to make it Then the process goes a lot more quickly. So I’m gonna gather all my materials now and we’ll start by heading down to the creek When a creek Rises it pushes sand up on this Bank and it’s a perfect spot to harvest it From my binder I’m gonna just pull a bunch of weeds around the yard. I’m choosing these because they have a stronger More durable stem like straw, but they should do the job. Just fine But I’m not going to pull them all out because I kind of think they’re pretty There’s more where this came from This will do for a start and I’ve got more if I need it I Stockpiled some clay here about a year ago, and it’s sort of weather down a little bit, but it’s still there So I’ll be using this as my source for the clay component of the cob The site for my furnace is gonna be right here beside my outdoor shed, which is still under construction one reason I’m putting it here. Is that in addition to smelting aluminum? I want to be able to put a coil in it and use it to heat this shed during the winter first thing I’ll do here is clear the area Next I’m gonna put in the base I don’t want this furnace sitting right on the ground Primarily because we’re over the top of a large oak trees root Network And I don’t want to damage the roots or let the fire get into the roots, which would be a bad thing I had a couple of bags of concrete that got wet and Solidifies so I’m gonna use those for the foundation for the stove It ain’t pretty but it will provide some Thermal protection for the ground and make a heart for this out of cob – the straw in place of that I’m going to use some crushed up ceramic This is the canvas shower liner that I use for the cob to make the bread oven and because it’s canvas its holding up nicely Ready to make some more The end set found the clay as well so to move them out As best as I can I’m chopping this up. It’ll mix well with the sand I Just left the dance crawl out. All right, I think I got most of the ants out. I’m gonna mix the cob Remember I find a spot that’s a little bit too squishy and just sprinkle on a little bit of sand Pull out the shower curtain liner into the middle and mixing again to help break down and mix any layers Some people recommend letting the cops It wrapped up overnight 24 hours or so to let the moisture really spread out evenly but you can also use it just like it is right now just Be prepared for some try spots and some wet spots you find anything. That’s too dry. Throw it back in and mix it up They put the first layer of top here on top of the concrete foundation I’m gonna use some salvaged bricks to kind of tidy it up a bit Now I’m going to add the pieces of broken ceramic mug for the floor of the heart since you’re super sure Just have a whole box of these we’re broken and I busted him up a little bit more this may be overkill But it’s better than these mugs going in the landfill Now I’m going to add another layer of ceramic And then a final layer of cub All right, so the foundation is finished I’m going to cover this up and let it dry out for a couple days Somebody is this 12 by 12 inch flue pipe to contain the cob on this furnace outside dimensions About 13 and a quarter Something I learned from my comments is that blue pipes like this are vitrified from a French word? Which means Glass and so they’re not made to handle high temperatures, but I’m gonna have a inner diameter here That’s actually gonna be the chimney and there’ll be lots of a good Insulated cob between those flue pipe and the heat the reason I’m doing this is because this is stabilized Cob if left exposed to the elements is going to simply erode away The hearth is harden up quite nicely and it’s now stabilized for the rest of the furnace to be built on top of it I’m going to continue my bricks Up another row and I’m going to slice down the hearth a little bit so that the bricks sit right on top of one another I’m gonna give you a quick look at the profile that I’m gonna build up with from here Because I want to speed through it. I’m going to start with a paver here And Then go with a thin fire brick on the first level this section of the firebox is going to be where the ash and Coals fall down so not as high heat as I’m going to be up here in the burn chamber On top of those. We’re going to have our great Just a reused grill grate here. And then on top of the grate, we’re gonna have a full fire brick And then beside the full fire brick we’re gonna have another paver and Then our flue pipe is going to sit on top of here course. I’m going to level all this out fill in these gaps as I go so Of course I want this dimension here To be the 13 inches of The flue pipe I want the flue pipe to sit outside the full fire bricks I’m going to adjust my profile just a little bit so that the tox of the bricks line up evenly All right, first layers done now, I need a second layer of fire brick Couple of pieces here in the back and then the final layer of the papers The finishing touch on the base in the firebox is a thin fire brick that goes across the top of the front here It will act as a shield to the bottom edge of the flue pipe. I don’t want that getting blasted with heat All right, the base is finished and now I’m going to actually grab the pipe then I’m going to use for the inside diameter of the the chimney portion I’ve got two different diameters of some scavenged pipe that I’m going to use for the chimney the first Smaller diameter is going to be the bottom portion of the chimney the last footer so I’m going to switch to the larger diameter That’s the part of the Timmy that’s going to hold the crucible For the chimney portion of the build. I’m going to add this draw binder to the cob Mash this out as flat as I can Since it started to firm up, it’s been about a week since I initially made this. I think it’ll be okay It is a little better to mix this in earlier in the process with I want to avoid any large clumps like that’ graph of the binder Alright it’s ready to go Whew, I’m out of breath As a workout one last check for level And I’m adding the cop with the binder in it I try and use the longer shape like this To allow for the binder to sort of stay intact and to be connecting that longer area for lateral strength Now the clock is running with the Thunder but it’s Georgia in the afternoon in the summer that’s just par for the course I pulled the pipe out because I got to put the flue pipe on next Put the pipe back in and build up the chimney. However, well it’s like this I want to go ahead and marry the round form up the cob chimney with the square form of the firebox Just for a smooth transition. I Now pronounce you chimney and firebox you may kiss the mud. Alright, let’s add the flue pipe And I’m gonna put the kite back in and start filling this up You can see how much Cobb will have to insulate and protect a flue pipe All right. This section is gonna be a little hard to see but I think you get the gist of it I’m doing this back filling around the pipe and work my way up And the rains come in I’m gonna keep working in spite of the rain but the camera is gonna stay in a covered spot I Need to make another batch of cob the storm has passed and I’m back at it. But in the meantime, I got the cop made all done I Saw that flash It lit it up even though it’s pretty bright out That’s close So the crucible is about nine inches tall and I want about an inch of it or inch and a half Sticking out of the top of the flue here. So it looks like I got about another inch of cob To add till I switch sizes of the pipe All right, we’re good to go now I’m gonna slide this pipe out There are a few gaps down in the chimney that I’m gonna fill And I’m also gonna round over the top Rounding over this edge Is going to help us transition between the two diameters of pipe I’ve cut two pieces of rebar that I’m going to put in here to support the crucible I’m gonna add a large pipe and finish out filling the flue pipe with cob The flue pipe is full of cob. Let’s pull out this pipe and make it light it up Now if you gaps to fill Had some dry firewood handy kindling My goal with his firebox was to be able to burn whole two-by-fours It’s my second test burn I made the mistake the first time of putting in two by fours, I was Thinking I might be able to burn those but because of the dimensionality of the 2×4 basically locks up against the side of the firebox It is kind of stack in there and then there’s no way for the air to move around the wood and it just doesn’t work It may try splitting some up Into less uniform pieces and that might work But for now, I’m sticking with round hard wood this is oak and it’s actually Largely from the tree right above me is the dead branches drop off the bottom. I’m able to Use them for fuel although I think when I use this as a forge, I’m gonna have to load the whole chimney full of fuel and Probably use a blower on the bottom just to get the temperatures I’m going to need to melt that aluminum to keep that intense heat right on the bottom of the crucible So we’ll see Delighted I’m going to use one of my rocket booster fire starters that I created to go with the rocket King my production rocket stove which you didn’t find on Amazon Got another one sitting in there. I’m gonna light with this one and the two of them together should get this going just a mixture of soy wax and Sawdust with a candle wick in it It’s really easy to put a fire out when you’ve got a rocket stove loaded just because it’s kind of a confined space So until it really gets going I don’t try and move the fire around I’m curious to see if I could get flames out of the top of this without the blower When this have to see How that works with the round wood I’m going to fill this firebox up as much as I can Which may not mean full because I want to make sure there’s room for air to flow in the top too It may take a little bit longer to get this going today just because it rained yesterday and Some of the wood is still a little bit damp, even though it’s had about 10 hours to dry It’ll boil the water out. Once it gets going still a little smoky out of the top though I’m gonna give this a little bit of air I’m getting close to the top here. It makes me happy All right, so I’ve been successful in getting the flames coming out of the top here with just the round wood burn Which I’m excited about It’s got a nice rocket sound to it A little more practice in testing. I’m gonna try this to melt some aluminum This is definitely the biggest rocket stove I’ve built so far and what makes a rocket stove green is the fact that I can use found fuel That’s dropped from the trees right around my backyard. You may notice that I changed into a clean shirt, which is Part of green shorts gear which you can find in the merchandise store Below the video as always our mission here at green shorts is to help you see green so you can be green and Save a little green by doing it yourself. Thanks so much for watching Please like and share keep all the great comments coming and we’ll see you in the next video

45 comments

  • rocktroll2002

    I wonder if a j tube feed would help you maintain heat you need to melt aluminum?

    Reply
  • DropForgedSurvival

    We love your Rocket King Camp Stove Design. We decided to want to introduce it to our epic loyal fans on our channel

    Reply
  • Malleus Maleficarum

    4:46 In most spa resorts, you have to pay for this kind of pleasure 😉

    Reply
  • Rhian Taylor

    I was just wondering how long you would need to leave it for the cob to dry naturally, weeks or months and then you lit it 🙂

    Reply
  • Bob w

    Nice build. One thing I see is to extend out a firebrick's length could help the draft as flames are at the entrance. If you have a few more it's worth a shot.

    Reply
  • Richard Solomon

    Great video Tom looking forward to seeing the crucible with liquid aluminum, and awesome to see Chris looking to promote your stove 🙂 great video team

    Reply
  • viddynovic

    "I now pronounce you chimney and fire box. You may kiss the mud!" LOL this part had me cracking up. Great video!

    Reply
  • cecil archie

    Nice job, I really enjoy watching your videos Mr. GreenShortz, thank you for taking the time to do them.

    Reply
  • Steve Pimblett

    This is absolutely brilliant. I was gifted a pile of refractory furnace bricks and I am going to make my very own "Max" cept I am going to call him Herman and every time I use him I am going to send over awesome karma vibes in your direction from Tasmania. Thank you SO much for sharing this tutorial! <3 🙂

    Reply
  • Josephine Hogg

    AWESOME! lost for words. what a fantastic concept through to construction. well done

    Reply
  • Peter Tucker

    Do you have an in door shed 😊?

    Reply
  • 자유인

    South Korea

    Reply
  • MrDkgio

    I really want to see your indoor shed now 🤪

    Reply
  • RallyeRacin9

    This is not a Rocket Stove.

    Reply
  • J

    What is with the exaggerated facial expressions on these thumbnails?!? Are you really that stupid, or do you think people are really that stupid?

    Reply
  • Douglas Smith

    A lot of people build rocket stoves out of uninsulated material because they're easier and faster to build. but the original rocket stoves were all insulated, especially the chimney. Insulation means less heat is absorbed by the building materials, making the combustion process hotter and cleaner.

    If you really want more heat to melt stuff, use insulated fire bricks and insulated chimney. For example mix clay and perlite to make an insulated cob mix. Using insulating materials you should be able to get well above 1500 degrees, possibly even above 2000.

    Reply
  • Dustin

    I am curious if you can get a temperature hot enough to melt it soften that rebar under the crucible?

    Reply
  • Matthew Tong

    I expected the mugs to be used as a decorative element lol bad move there.

    Reply
  • Steve Spence

    It would burn better if it was a true rocket stove.

    Reply
  • jackbquick123

    Cobb? When I was 4 I called it mud pies ☺ great video! I think I will try to make this,, thank you and God bless

    Reply
  • Tom Lamb

    THUMBS UP ,,

    Reply
  • Bud Pratt

    I like the forge rocket stove.

    Reply
  • wilda bezet

    A notification for your video popped up on my iPhone and I decided to to watch it. Just watching your thoughtful planning, use of natural materials, and problem solving skills, is very intriguing. I’m not planning to melt any aluminum, but I might be interested in an outdoor bread baking oven or even a kiln for firing pottery. Watching you mix cob was pretty amazing. I’m sure it’s an ancient skill. I also noted the comment about the use of perlite. Thanks for an interesting video and the food for thought.

    Reply
  • Byron Rolando Palacios Marroquin

    Es lo mejor, que he visto, y por muchas razones, espero poder hacerla muy pronto, gracias, y exitos.

    Reply
  • samantha nicholson

    Did it work, of so how long to melt aluminum?

    Reply
  • to to

    Exelente video gracias por compartir tu conocimiento …… Saludos desde Colombia

    Reply
  • ADHDalternatives

    Excellent presentation and design. Thank you for creating this video for us.

    Reply
  • Dan Faller

    Pine cones are a good starter

    Reply
  • Deblee Two

    What happened to the weeds/straw you were supposed to put in the cobb (cob?).

    Reply
  • Deblee Two

    What happened to the weeds/straw you were supposed to put in the cobb (cob?).

    Reply
  • chas marischen

    The 2×4's would have worked if you didn't put too many in. Cheeez!

    Reply
  • chas marischen

    I was able to cut your 29 min 48 sec video to less than 15 min., just as an experiment. Won't watch anything over 15 min.

    Reply
  • Eddie petrovich

    It looks like you're really getting a handle on the Cobb mixture…
    Good job!

    Reply
  • Victory First

    I can tell you were a grape crusher in the past. The rhythm is just right on. Keep on doing great work too.

    Reply
  • 김승환

    우와

    Reply
  • Michael Anderson

    I wonder has anyone use bamboo strands in concrete?

    Reply
  • auttocar.com

    What about a bigger fire box? but same chimney?

    Reply
  • محمودممدوح خضر

    Thank you.good

    Reply
  • luis valdebenito

    Crear job

    Reply
  • Gwen Strong

    Use your dryer lint as a starter also. Works great!!

    Reply
  • Belajar Bikin DIY

    Good job dude.. Lest come to my first video..
    Thanks

    Reply
  • J-won Kim

    우연히 들어왔는데 반가운 "안녕하세요"

    Reply
  • Rass Mass

    YOU FORGOT THE SAY THE TRAIN IS HERE AT THE SOUND OF THE HORNS ROARING HAHAHA

    Reply
  • MrAdamNTProtester

    Don't breathe in that alumin gas dude

    Reply
  • MrAdamNTProtester

    Very cool low tech build… love it thanks!

    Reply

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