Smash Ultimate: Art of Inkling

Smash Ultimate: Art of Inkling


Inklings are all about
deceptive movement and ink management. These fresh, fashionable, and agile creatures
have exceptional versatility and can switch between being aggressive
or defensive very fluidly. They have an amazing recovery,
are really good
at edgeguarding and ledge trapping, but can struggle to kill, as well as
they have weak out-of-shield options. They have the best dash dance in the game
that allows them to weave in and out of the opponent’s range,
making them really hard to space against. It also allows them to be unpredictable
in their decision-making. Their initial dash is not only fast
but will lower their hurtbox, allowing them to dodge a few projectiles
and a ton of other moves that don’t hit
low to the ground. Because of this, the Inklings are amazing
at whiff punishing
and controlling the pace of the game. Almost any move in their arsenal
that causes the opponent to get inked
will use up ink from the Ink Tank. To refill the tank,
you have to hold Shield and hold B, which will lower their hurtbox,
but it still makes them vulnerable, meaning you have to
manage your ink flexibly, as if you run out of ink,
none of their special moves will work
except your recovery. Their smashes will deal less damage
and have a smaller hitbox, as well as their rapid jab won’t work
at all, either. The more the opponent is covered in ink,
the more damage they will take
from all attacks. If an opponent is almost fully inked,
they will take ___x more damage
from all moves. If an opponent is almost fully inked,
they will take 1.5x more damage
from all moves. This will indirectly increase knockback
of multi-hit moves such as
up air or up smash, but it won’t affect the knockback at all
for single-hit moves. The ink will slowly start fading
from the opponent. However, the more they are inked,
the longer it takes for it to
start fading away. Back air is their main tool in the neutral
because of its speed, safety, and reward. The buffered aerial is not only safe on its own
if spaced, but you can also double jump before you land
with another back air and hit
tall opponents releasing shield or deny
all characters’ jumps out of shield. Doing it towards opponents will easily
cross them up, but it’s easily punishable. Keep in mind that the buffered back air
isn’t safe on hit
at starting percents till around mid-percents, so at low percents,
you’ll mostly want to space this move
for simple damage, then back off. At ~60–70%,
it will start to launch opponents
for a tech situation, in which case you can quickly fastfall
and try reading their
tech option in place with a grab or tech roll away with a grab. You can also do a back air and Roller
to punish a tech in place
or tech away for a potential kill. If they miss the tech,
the Roller won’t bury them. However, now instead they’ll be able to
dash jab and reset you for a forward smash. If you tech roll in, however,
you’ll be able to escape both of these setups— unless they read this and
dash back to grab, Roller the other way,
or do another aerial for another
tech chase setup. As for the landed aerial,
it is also unsafe on hit at starting percents— unless you actually land the back air
as low as you possibly can while fastfalling. If you do land it as low as possible, you’ll be able to combo into
a forward tilt, turnaround down tilt, and turnaround jab. Realistically, however,
you won’t consistently land it this low, and so you should just weave in and out
at starting percents for damage
rather than forcing it too much. After ~10–15%,
you’ll be able to connect this much easier, and you’ll also be able to connect
the second back air or grab… …as well as it makes tech chasing easier
at mid- to high percents. This low-landed back air is also exceptionally
safe against shield. Even if you don’t space it,
you’ll be able to jump to avoid grabs and even dash away from grabs. However, dash away and jump will still
lose to quick aerials, up smashes, or
up specials out of shield, which instead you can shield
and punish. Spacing it, however,
makes it a bit more beneficial as you’ll be able to shield their attempt on
punishing you with aerials without risking getting grabbed, as well as you can do another back air
to interrupt their aggression and even dash away
right after the spaced move,
only to dash back in again and whiff punish. If it’s crossed up, it’ll also be beneficial, as not only can you shield
but you’ll also allow yourself to safely jab to interrupt any attempted
aggression out of shield. Landing this back air as low as possible
is even safe against a parry! So, it makes for extremely good
corner pressure, as you can keep safely spacing it
while landing it low and react to how they try getting
back to the middle stage. Except for this,
you can short hop towards the opponent
for the intention of landing the back air, and if you see them jumping,
you’re able to double jump before you land
to anti-air their full hop. Or. just simply full hop back air
to cover full hop safely. And, if you manage to catch
double jumps back in, you’ll be able to drag them offstage
with back airs for an edgeguard. Another sneaky use is
to dash offstage with back air
for a really quick stage spike attempt. As for using it out of shield,
it’s actually really good because of
its speed and reach. It’s biggest weakness is that it won’t kill,
even at very high percents, mostly because of
how much you’ll stale it as well as there’s a sour spot
on Inkling’s arm. Mixing up both the buffered back air,
landed back air,
and any other move in their arsenal during dash dances is essential
to their gameplay. Neutral air is
a decent mix-up from time to time
to cross up a shield, especially since you can do
two of them in a short hop and either
land in front or cross up, as well as you can
neutral air to back air. This can still be punished with
a quick option
if reacted to pretty quickly. Therefore, it shouldn’t be used too often. Landing with neutral air, however,
is safe against shield
and will always set up for a combo. It’s their fastest out-of-shield option,
but it has very little range,
so it won’t counter most of the stuff. Its main uses is basically for setting up
a tech situation… …and aerial combos
to drag opponents offstage
if they are DI’ing in towards you. If they DI out,
none of these setups will work. However, you set yourself up for
an edgeguard, instead. It’s important to remember that
neutral air to neutral air
is never a combo against DI away, and so you don’t want to go for this
most of the time. Forward air is their most powerful aerial
and is best used offstage for edgeguarding, especially because of the
long-lasting hitbox. Otherwise, it can also be used to
anti-air jumps or pressure a shield if you space it and land it against
a character that can’t punish it. If you land and hit the sweet spot
that’s at their feet, it’ll lead into a combo… …while the sour spot that is at
their legs or the late part of the move
will instead force a tech situation. Up air is mainly used as a combo
after up throw. Otherwise, you can also use a
short hop buffered up air
to anti-air full hops or full hop up air
to score a kill at high percents. They’re also able to land it
to cross up a shield, and if the first aerial hits, it’ll connect into
up tilt, neutral air, or up smash. Down air can be used as a spike offstage. Otherwise, it can also be used against
buried opponents at mid-perents. If you ever connect the jab,
it’s always more useful to rapid jab. If you accidentally started hitting a shield, it’s better to finish it off with
the third hit of jab
as it’s much less punishable. The third jab can set up for a tech chase
at mid-percents, as well. Dash attack is quick and is mostly used
as a whiff punish. It won’t grant you any true combos,
but it’ll give you stage control
and an opportunity to catch a landing. It won’t cross up a shield
from far away, but it will cross up if you dash attack
super close to them. Forward tilt is mostly used to get
an opponent off of you. It’s not safe against shield, however. You could also use it
as a mix-up at starting percents
to set up for a tech chase. It’ll only start killing at
very high percents. Down tilt can apply pretty safe
shield pressure. It’s not safe against long-ranged
out-of-shield options, however. Connecting it won’t lead into anything
guaranteed, either. Instead, you’ll have to make a read on
what they’ll do next. Otherwise, it’s mainly for 2-Framing
opponents trying to recover. Up tilt is commonly used as a combo extender
after the first hit of up air. In which case, it leads into more up tilts
or neutral air. Forward smash is weak at the base
but gets much stronger till the tip of it. It’s basically a hard punish against
rolls in or jumps in. Down smash can be used as a mix-up
during a tech chase as the angle can potentially set up
for an edgeguard, and it’ll also cover tech roll in. Up smash has a hitbox in front
that pushes the opponent into the blast, making it a really good out-of-shield option or a hard commitment against jumps. There’s a sweet spot at the center of the blast
and is weaker on the outer edges
of the blast. None of their smash attacks are
safe against shield, however. Up throw is very straightforward. Which way you DI doesn’t matter.
The Inklings should be able to react to
where you’re launched and up air,
which is what you’ll want to do
at starting percents. At around mid-percents,
you can start going for full hop and then time the neutral air at the peak
into a back air or forward air. Forward air isn’t true,
but it can take a double jump. To get the back air, you can either
jump in towards them
and hit them with the backwards hitbox or turn around, then jump. At high percents,
you want to go back to using up air. This is also where
the most important part of their strategy
comes to play. Almost all characters can be
up thrown and killed at a specific right percentage, and it’s extremely important for you
to try getting, to work around the Inklings’ weakness
of struggling to kill. The timing of this input is pretty strict. You have to
hold the Jump button just as you up throw
to buffer the first jump, then double jump in the middle of the jump
at the same time as you do an up air, as well as you have to consider
their DI. The exact kill percents are linked
in the document
in the description down below. Up throwing at low percents onto a platform
will always allow you to extend
their starter combo and will also put them at
a worse position, where they might have to grab the ledge
and deal with a ledge trap. Down throw could be used as a rare mix-up
into neutral air if you notice or predict that the opponent
will be DI’ing in towards you, as if they don’t DI at all or DI away,
you won’t be getting any combos. It’ll also start killing beyond 200%. Back throw could also start killing at
extremely high percents if thrown
from the edge, and forward throw will ink opponents
but will only set up for a
potential edgeguard or ledge trap. The Roller is what complements the Inklings’
pressure and risk-reward game, whether you are looking to
catch a landing, catch an air dodge,
catch a tech, a ledge option… …using it as a mix-up as you dash dance
or during back air pressure… …It becomes up to you
to find clever uses for it to close out stocks
through finding habits. Once you press side B,
the Inkling will automatically start rolling
towards that direction. You can increase the speed
by holding forward or turn yourself around
by hitting backwards. You can cancel Roller after going
a certain amount of distance. Holding the A Button,
Special button, or Jump button
will cancel it as soon as possible. If you hit the Roller too early at low percents,
it won’t lead into anything and you’ll need to try anti-airing
as they mash out. If you hit it after rolling for half a second first,
you can cancel it early with the hit, and if you hit it at low percents,
you’ll want to cancel with a jump to back air. Hitting it at mid-percents sets up for
neutral air or down air to set up for
a combo or a tech chase. At high percents,
where a smash still won’t kill, you can Roller back into them and try
combo’ing into a forward air
unless they DI it away. And, once you hit it and can start killing,
you’ll want to just hold B or A or even C-Stick to normally cancel it
and charge either up smash or forward smash. Heavy characters won’t get launched by
the first hit of up smash. Against them,
you’ll want to be timing your up smash. While the opponent is grounded, you can tell that they are mashing
with how they move
as well as the dirt on top of them. When you start seeing the dust,
it means that they are just about to get out. This is where you want to release the up smash,
since they Bury armor is much weaker
at that point. You also won’t bury the opponent unless
you’re holding forward. Same thing happens if you hit the aerial Roller
against grounded opponents. The aerial Roller
won’t hit aerial opponents at all. The aerial Roller is mostly used as
a secondary recovery to either extend the horizontal recovery
or stall the recovery. It won’t really be good without the ink, though. The ink on the floor will stay for
a couple of seconds
and will slow down opponents moving in it. And, if you end up hitting a shield,
you’ll most likely always get punished for it. Super Jump
has a hitbox at the start of the move
and when it comes crashing down. It is vulnerable
during the whole recovery, however. The initial hit is pretty good at edgeguarding,
especially against disjointed recoveries. Splattershot will gradually cover
the opponent in ink. It can be aimed up and down
and has decent range. The closer you get to the stream,
the more in inks
as well as it starts making you flinch, not allowing you to punish them
from the ground. They can full hop over it, however, in which case
you’ll have to stop shooting immediately
to put your shield up or to dash away. If you shoot a shield,
they won’t be able to release it. They can only roll,
after having taken 11 hits. If they roll in from too far away,
they’ll roll into the stream, but if you shoot a shield too up close,
they can roll behind you and punish you, unless you stop shooting immediately. Its primary use is to apply a bit of ink
on the opponent from a distance, or while they’re hanging at the ledge
to reset the timer
for when the ink starts fading from them, as well as it can be aimed upwards
to try punishing aerial approaches. It’s also useful against throwable items,
like Bombs, Grenades, Pikmin, Fruits, and even a counter against Focus Attack. It’s also a decent mix-up from the ledge. The Splat Bomb is amazing
and has a ton of uses. It consumes about a fifth of your Ink Tank and will not work if you don’t have
the ink required. By tapping down B,
the Inkling will prepare a Bomb
and lob it in front. The longer you hold the B Button,
the further you’ll throw the Bomb. You are only able to spawn
one Bomb at a time. If the Bomb is moving at a fast rate,
it’ll detect a hurtbox on Frame 1
but explode on Frame 2. This is the main reason as to
why they get launched towards you
instead, sometimes: because it can sometimes explode
behind a target that’s moving toward you. If the Bomb is travelling at a slow rate,
it’ll detect a hurtbox and bounce off the opponent,
exploding at roughly Frame 17. And, no matter how fast it travels,
if it hits a shield,
it’ll bounce off and explode at Frame 17. If the Bomb doesn’t find a hurtbox,
it’ll explode after a certain time. The longer you charge the throw,
the longer it takes till it explodes on its own. Attacking the Bomb…
doesn’t really help much, but it can be reflected. These long-ranged Bombs can be used
as a mix-up during a dash dance against slower opponents
to pressure them. Otherwise, they can also be used
to snipe opponents offstage. Or, jump offstage while you lob one
together with aerials to edgeguard. If you jump,
immediately double jump
and lob the Bomb, you can add more pressure with
neutral air or back air
while the Bomb covers you. This can also be B-reversed. Their main use, however, is for
ledge trapping. There are two ways you can set up the Bomb
for ledge trapping. The first one is that you simply stand here
and lob it so it bounces. This allows you to pressure
the ledge jump and double jump,
but the explosion won’t cover the ledge stall. So, you’ll have to down tilt or down smash
to try punishing a ledge stall or a ledge roll. The counter to this is a ledge attack. But, if the Inkling stands
further away to outspace the attack,
you’ll get punished, and lobbing it correctly from this position
allows you to cover the ledge stall. This one is specifically a tricky one
to get past. The best thing you can do here is to
time you ledge jump perfectly so you take advantage of the
very small amount of ledge jump invincibility
as it explodes. Or, just gamble and go for a
regular get-up. Because the explosion can punish
the ledge stall, you’ll also be able to back air
to wall them out and try punishing their options with
any other commitment, such as
Rollers or smashes. Otherwise you can also shield to punish
regular get-ups and get-up attacks
with grab or ledge rolls with back air. Finally, combining a Bomb with a ledge trump
can also be extremely effective, as the only thing it wouldn’t cover
is ledge roll. If you guys enjoyed this video,
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