Sugar Glider in Slow Motion | Slow Motion Wild Animals | Love Nature

Sugar Glider in Slow Motion | Slow Motion Wild Animals | Love Nature


Life in the canopy can
present a challenge. Fortunately, the sugar
glider has developed a way to travel through the treetops. Its gravity-defying moves
can only be appreciated by slowing them down. When a sugar glider spots a tasty insect on a neighboring tree,
it has a remarkable way of catching its dinner. Its widely spaced eyes
improve its depth perception and allow it to estimate
the distance to its meal. First, it crouches down to
coil up tension like a spring. A kick of the hind limbs
launches into into space. A jump like this will land
most mammals on the ground, but the sugar glider has a secret weapon, a gliding membrane, a flap of loose skin between its fingers and ankles. When stretched, it produces enough drag to fight the force of gravity
and keep the glider aloft. In the wild, this creature can glide down between trees almost 200 feet. To steer, the sugar glider changes the curvature of the membrane and uses its tail as a rudder. To slow down, the glider moves
its limbs down and forward. The gliding membrane billows like a sail, trapping air to create maximum resistance. When coming in to land,
its sharp claws ensure there’s no skidding off the landing pad. Using all four limbs as shock absorbers reduces the crash force,
but with some velocity left, the occasional face smash is inevitable. It’s all worth it for a nighttime snack.

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