Visit Your Gliding Site!

Visit Your Gliding Site!


Hi! Welcome to a series of videos designed to
help you prepare for the Glider Pilot Scholarship course. My name is Eileen Carter. I’m a glider instructor, and I’ll be guiding
you through this series with the help of my fellow instructors and pilots! In this video we’ll be discussing our most
important tip for you as you prepare to go on your course: Visiting your local gliding
site! You can view the subtitles for this video
by clicking the CC button below, and you can choose your language, under settings! A couple of notes before we get started. These videos were created as a training aid
to help you in your preparations, but they can’t replace a proper briefing from a qualified
instructor. It’s possible that despite our best efforts
these videos could contain errors, and so it’s important that you refer to official
sources and documentation. Additionally, policies, procedures, and techniques
change from year to year, and so there could be variations from what you see depicted in
these videos. Finally, there are five different schools
across Canada, and each has minor variations in the ways that they conduct training, and
in their local procedures. These videos are being produced with the students
who are going to Saint Jean, Quebec in mind, however the information will be at least partly
useful to students who will be learning elsewhere. This is one of several videos in a series,
so for more information and to best prepare yourself do go ahead and click subscribe below
and click on the bell too, so you are notified as videos are posted. If you haven’t already seen our video that
gives a quick overview of the course, you’re going to want to watch that because it is
the starting point for the rest of these videos. We’ll make sure to include a link below. Make sure to look for the other videos in
this series so you can be well prepared for your course in the summer! You can subscribe to this channel to keep
up to date! Okay! At this point you probably have a lot of different
questions, about the course, about flying, about where you’ll be staying, and about
how you can be as prepared as possible for your course. Well, our number one tip, that we hear over
and over from people who took the course in previous years, is visit your gliding site! If you are applying, and especially if you
have been selected for the Glider Pilot Scholarship course, heading out to your gliding site is
one of the most important steps that you can take to prepare yourself. You can visit when you’re squadron is already
scheduled for a familiarization day, and in some cases you can get permission to visit
on other days too. Why is visiting a gliding site our top preparation
tip? Well, there is a lot to learn once you arrive
at the gliding school in the summer. There is ground school, how to fly, and also
how to do the different jobs on the airfield. You’ll spend about half of most days on
the airfield, and when you aren’t flying you’ll be helping to launch the gliders
and retrieve them once they land. These roles are really important, both for
safety reasons and for efficiency reasons. A well run glider field is a pleasant place,
and can mean more flying for you and your course mates! With all of the different skills to learn
and practice, the first week of the course is really busy. One way to feel more at ease is to arrive
at the course with some experience, and the best place to get that experience is at your
local gliding site. Glider course candidates can be permitted
to visit the gliding site for one or more days in the spring (and sometimes in the fall)
before the summer of their course. In some cases they arrive on the bus with
the other people from their squadron, but in other cases it is possible to join the
pilots from the gliding site when they carpool in vans at the beginning of the day. Identifying yourself as a candidate for the
Glider Pilot Course can allow you to take on a more advanced role as a member of the
“ground crew” – people who help with the function of the operations on the ground,
such as the launching and retrieving of gliders. Usually this will mean you’ll spend most
of your day (not just a few hours) at the airfield, and you’ll have exposure to more
of the jobs on the airfield, not just pushing the glider around. Throughout the day, qualified glider pilots
will show you the ropes! You’ll be introduced to tasks like how to
move and steer the glider on the ground, how to hook up the glider to the tow rope, how
to do launch signals, and safety considerations around the aircraft. Often you’ll get informal lessons about
other parts of glider operations too, like the parts of the glider, how to ensure a glider
is ready for a flight, how to complete a pre-take-off check, and more! You’ll be under close supervision and you’ll
get lots of one-on-one training. This can also be a great chance to ask questions
about the course, since your teachers will often be pilots who learned to fly in the
past few summers. They can give you recent information about
everything from the course schedule, to ground school, to daily life and more. Depending on the gliding site, you may also
get a chance to speak to a glider instructor, who can give you insight into the course from
an instructional point of view. If time permits, they may even talk to you
about some of the basics of how to glide! Each year, around 25% of the students who
arrive for training in St Jean have spent some time at their local gliding site. These students find themselves a key part
of the glider operation in the first few days, while their fellow students learn on the go. Those with more experience often tell us that
they had lower stress levels in those first few days because they already had some knowledge
of what was expected of them. They could perform their tasks more easily,
and that gave them more energy to focus on their flying and their classroom studies. They also enjoyed helping their fellow students
learn their roles. If you’re interested in an opportunity to
be “ground crew” at your local gliding site, you’ll want to make contact and get
permission as early as practical. Gliding usually starts in early or mid April,
and goes as late as the end of May, depending on your local schedule. There are several ways to get permission. Start by discussing this opportunity with
your officers, and ask to be put in touch with someone from the local gliding site. If your squadron has glider pilots, you can
approach them and ask about being ground crew. You can also sign up for your squadron’s
gliding day, and introduce yourself to the pilots at the site when you arrive. If you would like to participate as ground
crew outside of your squadron’s planned gliding day, you’ll need to get advanced
permission from your squadron chain of command as well as the people in charge of the gliding
site. This can allow you to participate for several
days of the gliding season, and will give you some solid experience in a variety of
roles. Plus, it’s lots of fun to hang out with pilots
at an airport for the day! Alright! I hope you enjoyed this video! Don’t forget to subscribe to this channel
and click that little bell, so that you’ll see more videos as we come out with them. We’re definitely adding to our collection
and we want you to benefit from these resources so you can be as prepared as possible for
your glider pilot course. Leave a comment below to tell us if you plan
to visit your local gliding site! We’ll see you in the next video! Bye for now!

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